Hiring the Best Candidate – Not Just One that Interviews Well

The Internet, media and the library are full of tips on how to interview. That means the savvy job seeker has probably gotten pretty darn good at answering any standard interview questions you throw at them.  So how can you see past excellent interviewing skills to the candidate who will really make the best new hire?

Hire For Attitude, Train for Skills

Experienced employers understand that there is nothing more important in a new employee than someone who fits into your culture. Many skills can be taught, but there is nothing to be done about a new hire who simply doesn’t mesh with your team or agree with your business philosophies.

Hire People Who Seek Challenges

Don’t look for candidates who are currently doing exactly what your open position requires. Find people who would need to stretch just a bit to succeed on the job. The last thing you need, if you expect to keep moving your business forward, is to add people to your team who are satisfied with the status quo.

Introverts May Not Interview Well

If you are looking for an individual contributor, such as technical or creative help, the most talented individuals may not be the most outgoing. Don’t overlook those who stammer or hesitate, instead ask to see a portfolio representing their body of work. Don’t lose a top prospect over a bad case of stage fright.

Take Your Time

Confirmation bias can be a big problem. That means, you meet someone in the lobby who is impeccably dressed, has a firm handshake and a winning smile and you are predisposed to like them. Throughout the interview you will focus only on the positives and subconsciously ignore the negatives, slanting the interview in the candidate’s favor.  Combine this with a rush to get a position filled quickly and you are well on your way to a bad hire. Take your time to get to know the candidate and interview plenty of people without making snap judgments.

Go Off Script

Don’t just ask standard interview questions. They are fine for breaking the ice, but be sure to ask follow-up questions to allow candidates to elaborate on their answers. Ask for examples of how they have handled situations they could encounter in their new job.  You can choose questions that are a little more thoughtful and probing without resorting to excessively quirky questions that reveal little about the candidate.

Listen More Than You Speak

Ideally, the interview will become a dialogue. This may require you to draw the candidate out and allow them to give you details and background on accomplishments they are proud of or challenges they face. The more two-way the conversation becomes, the better your chance of getting to know the real person on the other side of the table and making a wise hiring decision.

When you need help finding the best candidates, High Profile is here to help. Our experts can connect you with high-quality, experienced people. Call us today at 972-991-7900 to get started.

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