Write an Elevator Pitch That Stands Out

When you are a job candidate, one of the best things you can do is to sell yourself to potential employers. Your efforts to paint yourself as the perfect candidate should go beyond just creating a basic resume. It’s also important to be prepared with an “elevator pitch”, which is essentially a summary lasting about as long as an elevator ride and aimed at convincing a company to hire you.

Coming up with an elevator pitch can be complicated, but if you do it, you can use it time and again to introduce yourself at job fairs, interviews, in cover letters and at networking events. If you’re not sure where to start with your elevator pitch, consider these helpful tips:

  • Focus on your biggest accomplishments. An elevator pitch needs to be brief, so don’t summarize every professional success you have ever had. Instead, focus on what truly makes you the perfect candidate for a position you are interested in. Think about one or two big professional accomplishments that best exemplify your abilities and make those the centerpiece of your elevator pitch.
  • Be specific about your achievements. An elevator pitch is no time for vague platitudes. You want to talk yourself up by sharing details of objective successes so the listener can see the fact you have talent. This could mean discussing how you exceeded quotas, won awards at work or moved quickly up the ladder because of your talents and commitment to success.
  • Make sure your pitch answers the three big questions. Your elevator pitch needs to clearly explain who you are, what you do and what you are looking for in a new position. Practice your pitch with friends or family and ask them if the information you provided gave them enough details to answer these three questions.

High Profile can help you connect with employers who are hiring so you’ll have the best chance to sell yourself to companies where you’d love to work. Contact us today at 972-991-7900 or online to find out about the assistance our staffing service can offer.

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